Abstract

The Australian Museum has in its collection a fine example of a large plank-built raiding canoe from the Western Solomon Islands. This canoe was obtained in 1915 from Roviana Lagoon where it is known as a tomoko in the Roviana language. These canoes are examples of great technical ability and artistry. They have been and continue to be important cultural symbols in the Solomon Islands. In this paper I review the history of the tomoko raiding canoes in the Western Solomons and describe their role in 19th century traditional society. I discuss efforts by the British colonial government first to destroy them and the political system they represented, and then to co-opt them as symbols of the new colony and subsequently the nation-state.

 
Download Complete Work

Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Sheppard, 2021. Tech. Rep. Aust. Mus., Online 34: 231–244
Author
Peter J. Sheppard
Year
2021
Title
Tomoko: raiding canoes of the western Solomon Islands. In From Field to Museum—Studies from Melanesia in Honour of Robin Torrence, ed. Jim Specht, Val Attenbrow, and Jim Allen
Serial Title
Technical Reports of the Australian Museum online
Volume
34
Start Page
231
End Page
244
DOI
10.3853/j.1835-4211.34.2021.1754
Language
en
Date Published
12 May 2021
Cover Date
12 May 2021
ISSN
ISSN 1835-4211 (online)
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ANTHROPOLOGY; ARCHAEOLOGY; OCEAN: PACIFIC
Digitized
12 May 2021
Available Online
12 May 2021
Reference Number
1754
EndNote
1754.enw
Title Page
1754.pdf
File size: 0 bytes
Complete Work
1754_complete.pdf
File size: 0 bytes