Abstract

Electron microprobe analyses were conducted on volcanic glasses extracted from Holocene tephra marker beds on the Willaumez isthmus in West New Britain, Papua New Guinea. These tephra beds are pivotal in the dating of a wide range of human artefacts and manuports found in the intervening buried soils, extending back over the last 40,000 years. Three major groups can be easily separated: W-K1 and 2; W-K3 and 4; and the Dakataua tephra. Of the remaining post-W-K4 tephras, most show slightly higher FeO and CaO and lower SiO2 contents than the W-K3 and 4 group, although there is some overlap. The combination of these geochemical data sets with the known stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates has helped resolve tephra correlation where these ashes become thin and less visually diagnostic or where pumice has been resorted and redeposited by the Kulu-Dulagi River.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Neall et al., 2021. Tech. Rep. Aust. Mus., Online 34: 5–24
Author
Vincent Neall; Lucy McGee; Michael Turner; Tanya O’Neill; Anke Zernack; J. Stephen Athens
Year
2021
Title
Geochemical fingerprinting of Holocene tephras in the Willaumez Isthmus District of West New Britain, Papua New Guinea. In From Field to Museum—Studies from Melanesia in Honour of Robin Torrence, ed. Jim Specht, Val Attenbrow, and Jim Allen
Serial Title
Technical Reports of the Australian Museum online
Volume
34
Start Page
5
End Page
24
DOI
10.3853/j.1835-4211.34.2021.1740
Language
en
Date Published
12 May 2021
Cover Date
12 May 2021
ISSN
ISSN 1835-4211 (online)
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ANTHROPOLOGY; ARCHAEOLOGY; NEW BRITAIN
Digitized
12 May 2021
Available Online
12 May 2021
Reference Number
1740
EndNote
1740.enw
Title Page
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